Bibliography

“Five Things You Can Do About Gentrification in New York City,” tomangotti.com, February 18, 2013

by Tom Angotti, Professor Emeritus of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Angotti was the founder and director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development. He is the author of many books, essays, and articles on urban development, focusing on issues of race, class, and environmental sustainability.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“The Fine Art of Gentrification,” October vol. 31, 1984

by Rosalyn Deutsche and Cara Gendel Ryan. In the early 1980’s, New York’s East Village became a hub for artists and galleries. This foundational essay reframes the East Village art scene and the majority of its promoters as contributors to the displacement of the area’s working class inhabitants. Rosalyn Deutsche is an art historian and critic who teaches modern and contemporary art at Barnard College/Columbia University.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Photography and Representing the Outside,” The Complete Essays, 1973–1991, 2016

by Luigi Ghirri (1943–92). The Italian conceptual photographer playfully explored framing, mapping, scale, and symmetry in his work. Beginning in the 1970s, he also wrote short essays on photography and culture. This essay begins with the impact of the first photograph of the Earth from the Moon.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Debt and Study,” The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013

by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten. These interdisciplinary thinkers have collaborated on a number of essays and publications that draw from the Black radical tradition and autonomist and postcolonial theories to put forth economic, political, and aesthetic critiques.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

An excerpt from “Fantasy in the Hold,” The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013

by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten. These interdisciplinary thinkers have collaborated on a number of essays and publications that draw from the Black radical tradition and autonomist and postcolonial theories to put forth economic, political, and aesthetic critiques. Harney is Honorary Professor at The Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia and Moten is a poet and professor of performance studies at New York University.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Special Flushing Waterfront District: A Massive Giveaway?,” Gotham Gazette, January 31, 2020

by Tarry Hum, Professor and Chair of Queens College’s Department of Urban Studies, and member of the Doctoral Faculty at the Graduate Center’s Environmental Psychology program. Hum’s research areas include immigrant urbanism, transnational capital and real estate financialization, urban planning and community economic development. Her scholarship and activism have often focused on these issues in the neighborhood of Flushing, Queens.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

The Third Definitive Article of Perpetual Peace: a Philosophical Sketch, 1795

by Immanuel Kant (1724–1804). As a whole, Kant’s essay outlines principles for sustained peaceful relations between nations, laying the groundwork for today’s international law and global bodies such as the United Nations. The Third Definitive Article states that “hospitality signifies the claim of a stranger entering foreign territory to be treated by its owner without hostility,” and builds an argument for the rights of the refugee.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“TBD NYC,” 2013

by Stephen Korns, Susan Jahoda, and Caroline Woolard, founding members of NYC TBD, a community land trust (CLT) initiative for internet activists, artists, makers, and community organizers, formed in 2012. NYCTBD transformed in 2014 when the group decided to support the New York City Community Land Initiative rather than focusing on collective housing for artists. Stephen, Susan, and Caroline continue to be in a collective living “pod” during COVID-19.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Interview: Simon Leung and Hong-An Truong,” Shifter 18: Intention, 2012.

Hong-An Truong’s conversation with Leung focuses on Leung’s ”squatting projects” which have used the squatting body as a performative intervention since 1994. Truong is an artist and Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at University of North Carolina.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

Program for The Mind is a Muscle at Anderson Theater, New York, April 1968

by Yvonne Rainer, experimental dancer, choreographer, and filmmaker. The program for the performance includes a text by Rainer, in which she states “The world disintegrates around me. My connection to the world-in-crisis remains tenuous and remote.” Rainer invokes this tension between concept and materiality in her role as Edgar Allan Poe in Leung’s POE.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

Excerpt from The Park and the People: A History of Central Park, 1992.

by Roy Rosenzweig and Elizabeth Blackmar. This excerpt tells the story of Seneca Village, a community of free often landowning Black people displaced from the land that would become Central Park. Roy Alan Rosenzweig (1950–2007) was an historian at George Mason University in Virginia. Blackmar is Professor of American History at Columbia University.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Tompkins Square Park Timeline,” Krzysztof Wodiczko, New York City Tableaux: Tompkins Square, the Homeless Vehicle Project, 1989

by Neil Smith (1954–2012) geographer and activist. The timeline was produced for the exhibition catalog of Wodiczko’s 1989 exhibition at the alternative space Exit Art, New York. Smith traces the history of conflict at Tompkins Square Park in the East Village from 1831 through the end of the 1980s, revealing a pattern of conflict, occupation, and expulsion spanning nearly 150 years. Smith was Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Why Gentrification?,” Capital City: Gentrification and the Real Estate State, 2019

by Samuel Stein, PhD candidate in Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and Urban Studies instructor at Hunter College. His scholarship addresses the increasingly powerful faction of government that seeks to bend public policy to support ever-rising property values. Stein has collaborated with Hum on a number of articles about how Sunset Park, Flushing, and Manhattan’s Chinatown are interwoven in a larger system of gentrification.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“Against Black Homeownership,” Adapted from Race For Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, 2019

by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, who writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. She is also author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, which won the Lannan Cultural Freedom Award for an Especially Notable Book in 2016. She is Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

“How Real Estate Segregated America,” Dissent, Fall 2018

by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, who writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. In this essay, Taylor outlines the policies of predatory inclusion that have shaped homeownership since the Fair Housing Act and the HUD Act of 1968. Born from the civic uprisings of 1967–68, and intended as remedies for years of de jure housing segregation, their failure, Taylor argues, stems from the entanglement of public policy with real estate interests.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

United States Congress, Proceedings and Debates of the 91st Congress, First Session. United States Congress, June 10,1969, and United States Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences, June 24, 1969.

Minutes from the Congressional Record—House (1969) and the United States Senate Executive Session (1969), including S. 1941, a bill to authorize appropriations to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for research and development, construction of facilities, and research and program management, and other purposes. Under this proposal, members of Congress discussed if and which flags and symbols should be planted on the Moon.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

Excerpt from A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None, 2018

by Kathryn Yusoff. This text takes as its basis the proposed geological epoch dating from the start of significant human impacts on Earth’s geology and ecosystems known as the Anthropocene. Connecting Black feminist theory, geography, and the earth sciences, Yusoff argues the very discipline of geology is rooted in the extractive economies of colonialism and slavery. She is Professor of Inhuman Geography at Queen Mary University of London.

Selected by . . .

Selected by . . .

Bibliography

“Five Things You Can Do About Gentrification in New York City,” tomangotti.com, February 18, 2013

by Tom Angotti, Professor Emeritus of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Angotti was the founder and director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development. He is the author of many books, essays, and articles on urban development, focusing on issues of race, class, and environmental sustainability.

“The Fine Art of Gentrification,” October vol. 31, 1984

by Rosalyn Deutsche and Cara Gendel Ryan. In the early 1980’s, New York’s East Village became a hub for artists and galleries. This foundational essay reframes the East Village art scene and the majority of its promoters as contributors to the displacement of the area’s working class inhabitants. Rosalyn Deutsche is an art historian and critic who teaches modern and contemporary art at Barnard College/Columbia University.

“Photography and Representing the Outside,” The Complete Essays, 1973–1991, 2016

by Luigi Ghirri (1943–92). The Italian conceptual photographer playfully explored framing, mapping, scale, and symmetry in his work. Beginning in the 1970s, he also wrote short essays on photography and culture. This essay begins with the impact of the first photograph of the Earth from the Moon.

“Debt and Study,” The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013

by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten. These interdisciplinary thinkers have collaborated on a number of essays and publications that draw from the Black radical tradition and autonomist and postcolonial theories to put forth economic, political, and aesthetic critiques.

An excerpt from “Fantasy in the Hold,” The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013

by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten. These interdisciplinary thinkers have collaborated on a number of essays and publications that draw from the Black radical tradition and autonomist and postcolonial theories to put forth economic, political, and aesthetic critiques. Harney is Honorary Professor at The Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia and Moten is a poet and professor of performance studies at New York University.

“Special Flushing Waterfront District: A Massive Giveaway?,” Gotham Gazette, January 31, 2020

by Tarry Hum, Professor and Chair of Queens College’s Department of Urban Studies, and member of the Doctoral Faculty at the Graduate Center’s Environmental Psychology program. Hum’s research areas include immigrant urbanism, transnational capital and real estate financialization, urban planning and community economic development. Her scholarship and activism have often focused on these issues in the neighborhood of Flushing, Queens.

The Third Definitive Article of Perpetual Peace: a Philosophical Sketch, 1795

by Immanuel Kant (1724–1804). As a whole, Kant’s essay outlines principles for sustained peaceful relations between nations, laying the groundwork for today’s international law and global bodies such as the United Nations. The Third Definitive Article states that “hospitality signifies the claim of a stranger entering foreign territory to be treated by its owner without hostility,” and builds an argument for the rights of the refugee.

“TBD NYC,” 2013

by Stephen Korns, Susan Jahoda, and Caroline Woolard, founding members of NYC TBD, a community land trust (CLT) initiative for internet activists, artists, makers, and community organizers, formed in 2012. NYCTBD transformed in 2014 when the group decided to support the New York City Community Land Initiative rather than focusing on collective housing for artists. Stephen, Susan, and Caroline continue to be in a collective living “pod” during COVID-19.

“Interview: Simon Leung and Hong-An Truong,” Shifter 18: Intention, 2012.

Hong-An Truong’s conversation with Leung focuses on Leung’s ”squatting projects” which have used the squatting body as a performative intervention since 1994. Truong is an artist and Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at University of North Carolina.

Program for The Mind is a Muscle at Anderson Theater, New York, April 1968

by Yvonne Rainer, experimental dancer, choreographer, and filmmaker. The program for the performance includes a text by Rainer, in which she states “The world disintegrates around me. My connection to the world-in-crisis remains tenuous and remote.” Rainer invokes this tension between concept and materiality in her role as Edgar Allan Poe in Leung’s POE.

Excerpt from The Park and the People: A History of Central Park, 1992.

by Roy Rosenzweig and Elizabeth Blackmar. This excerpt tells the story of Seneca Village, a community of free often landowning Black people displaced from the land that would become Central Park. Roy Alan Rosenzweig (1950–2007) was an historian at George Mason University in Virginia. Blackmar is Professor of American History at Columbia University.

“Tompkins Square Park Timeline,” Krzysztof Wodiczko, New York City Tableaux: Tompkins Square, the Homeless Vehicle Project, 1989

by Neil Smith (1954–2012) geographer and activist. The timeline was produced for the exhibition catalog of Wodiczko’s 1989 exhibition at the alternative space Exit Art, New York. Smith traces the history of conflict at Tompkins Square Park in the East Village from 1831 through the end of the 1980s, revealing a pattern of conflict, occupation, and expulsion spanning nearly 150 years. Smith was Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

“Why Gentrification?,” Capital City: Gentrification and the Real Estate State, 2019

by Samuel Stein, PhD candidate in Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and Urban Studies instructor at Hunter College. His scholarship addresses the increasingly powerful faction of government that seeks to bend public policy to support ever-rising property values. Stein has collaborated with Hum on a number of articles about how Sunset Park, Flushing, and Manhattan’s Chinatown are interwoven in a larger system of gentrification.

“Against Black Homeownership,” Adapted from Race For Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, 2019

by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, who writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. She is also author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, which won the Lannan Cultural Freedom Award for an Especially Notable Book in 2016. She is Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University.

“How Real Estate Segregated America,” Dissent, Fall 2018

by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, who writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. In this essay, Taylor outlines the policies of predatory inclusion that have shaped homeownership since the Fair Housing Act and the HUD Act of 1968. Born from the civic uprisings of 1967–68, and intended as remedies for years of de jure housing segregation, their failure, Taylor argues, stems from the entanglement of public policy with real estate interests.

United States Congress, Proceedings and Debates of the 91st Congress, First Session. United States Congress, June 10,1969, and United States Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences, June 24, 1969.

Minutes from the Congressional Record—House (1969) and the United States Senate Executive Session (1969), including S. 1941, a bill to authorize appropriations to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for research and development, construction of facilities, and research and program management, and other purposes. Under this proposal, members of Congress discussed if and which flags and symbols should be planted on the Moon.

Excerpt from A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None, 2018

by Kathryn Yusoff. This text takes as its basis the proposed geological epoch dating from the start of significant human impacts on Earth’s geology and ecosystems known as the Anthropocene. Connecting Black feminist theory, geography, and the earth sciences, Yusoff argues the very discipline of geology is rooted in the extractive economies of colonialism and slavery. She is Professor of Inhuman Geography at Queen Mary University of London.