Betty Yu

“I’ve admired Tarry Hum’s work for a very long time, as well as Sam Stein’s. They are both scholars that I have such deep respect for, because they understand the role of academia within grassroots organizing, within anti-gentrification organizing, and within the larger container of social, economic, and racial justice movements. We need popular education that is written in a very accessible way, that’s digestible for everyday people to understand the dynamics of real estate, the dynamics of the creative class, of art and gentrification by the real estate developers—how they all fit together—so that they can be organizing tools for the people on the ground and on the frontlines. . . .”

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Betty Yu, video still from *The Fight for Flushing*, 2020. Multi-channel video, sound, durations variable. Presented as a component of *Resistance in Progress*, 2020. Combined media installation with video, sound, housing ads, protest flyers, and live community events. Courtesy the artist.
“Flushing is Not For Sale,” flyers in Spanish and Simplified Chinese. Digital images, dimensions variable. Components of Betty Yu, *Resistance in Progress*, 2020. Combined media installation with video, sound, housing ads, protest flyers, and live community events. Courtesy of Cchaya CDC (Community Development Corporation), and FED Up (Flushing for Equitable Development and Urban Planning) Coalition, and Minkwon Center.
“Flushing is Not For Sale,” flyers in Spanish and Simplified Chinese. Digital images, dimensions variable. Components of Betty Yu, *Resistance in Progress*, 2020. Combined media installation with video, sound, housing ads, protest flyers, and live community events. Courtesy of Cchaya CDC (Community Development Corporation), and FED Up (Flushing for Equitable Development and Urban Planning) Coalition, and Minkwon Center.\n
 
“Why Gentrification?,” Capital City: Gentrification and the Real Estate State, 2019

by Samuel Stein, PhD candidate in Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and Urban Studies instructor at Hunter College. His scholarship addresses the increasingly powerful faction of government that seeks to bend public policy to support ever-rising property values. Stein has collaborated with Hum on a number of articles about how Sunset Park, Flushing, and Manhattan’s Chinatown are interwoven in a larger system of gentrification.

“Special Flushing Waterfront District: A Massive Giveaway?,” Gotham Gazette, January 31, 2020

by Tarry Hum, Professor and Chair of Queens College’s Department of Urban Studies, and member of the Doctoral Faculty at the Graduate Center’s Environmental Psychology program. Hum’s research areas include immigrant urbanism, transnational capital and real estate financialization, urban planning and community economic development. Her scholarship and activism have often focused on these issues in the neighborhood of Flushing, Queens.

Betty Yu, installation view, *(Dis)placed in Sunset Park*, 2019, BRIC Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn. Interactive multimedia installation, with video and sound, durations variable. Courtesy BRIC, Brooklyn, photo credit: Jason Wyche. \n
Betty Yu, installation view, *(Dis)placed in Sunset Park*, 2019, BRIC Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn. Interactive multimedia installation including two organza vertical displays with Sunset Park redlining maps of 1934 and maps from 1960s, and family photos. Courtesy BRIC, Brooklyn, photo credit: Jason Wyche.
Betty Yu, *Dad—still, quiet and daydreaming*, *(Dis)Placed in Sunset Park Photography Series*, 2019.  Digital image, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist.
 

Betty Yu holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and a MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College. Her work has been exhibited, screened and featured at BRIC, Brooklyn, NY (2019); Open Source Gallery, New York, NY (2018); International Center of Photography, New York, NY, (date); Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY (2015); George Eastman Kodak Museum, Rochester, NY, (date), Director’s Guild of America Asian Pacific Film & Video Festival, Los Angeles, CA, (2002); No Longer Empty Pop-up, New York, NY, (2013), and more. She has been an artist in residence at International Studio & Curatorial Program (2017), SPACE at Ryder Farm (2017), Skidmore College’s Documentary Studies Collaborative (2017), and Laundromat Project (2012).

Betty Yu

“I’ve admired Tarry Hum’s work for a very long time, as well as Sam Stein’s. They are both scholars that I have such deep respect for, because they understand the role of academia within grassroots organizing, within anti-gentrification organizing, and within the larger container of social, economic, and racial justice movements. We need popular education that is written in a very accessible way, that’s digestible for everyday people to understand the dynamics of real estate, the dynamics of the creative class, of art and gentrification by the real estate developers—how they all fit together—so that they can be organizing tools for the people on the ground and on the frontlines. . . .”

 
“Why Gentrification?,” Capital City: Gentrification and the Real Estate State, 2019

by Samuel Stein, PhD candidate in Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and Urban Studies instructor at Hunter College. His scholarship addresses the increasingly powerful faction of government that seeks to bend public policy to support ever-rising property values. Stein has collaborated with Hum on a number of articles about how Sunset Park, Flushing, and Manhattan’s Chinatown are interwoven in a larger system of gentrification.

“Special Flushing Waterfront District: A Massive Giveaway?,” Gotham Gazette, January 31, 2020

by Tarry Hum, Professor and Chair of Queens College’s Department of Urban Studies, and member of the Doctoral Faculty at the Graduate Center’s Environmental Psychology program. Hum’s research areas include immigrant urbanism, transnational capital and real estate financialization, urban planning and community economic development. Her scholarship and activism have often focused on these issues in the neighborhood of Flushing, Queens.

 

Betty Yu holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and a MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College. Her work has been exhibited, screened and featured at BRIC, Brooklyn, NY (2019); Open Source Gallery, New York, NY (2018); International Center of Photography, New York, NY, (date); Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY (2015); George Eastman Kodak Museum, Rochester, NY, (date), Director’s Guild of America Asian Pacific Film & Video Festival, Los Angeles, CA, (2002); No Longer Empty Pop-up, New York, NY, (2013), and more. She has been an artist in residence at International Studio & Curatorial Program (2017), SPACE at Ryder Farm (2017), Skidmore College’s Documentary Studies Collaborative (2017), and Laundromat Project (2012).